Andrew Tate through the lens of CRHS students

Grace Wayment, Design Editor

As some may know Andrew Tate is a former professional kickboxer, and a social media influencer. He’s known for his strategies on becoming rich. Tate himself owns a chain of casinos with his brother Tristan Tate, and has also started his own digital production company and private communities. The digital production company and private communities require payment previous to entry. These communities are known as Hustlers University, which provide education and training to become rich. Tate also invests in cryptocurrency which in total makes him a multi-millionaire. 

Not only is Tate known for his popular rise to riches, he’s also known for his ideologies towards women. These ideologies consist of the belief that women belong in the home, cannot drive, and are the property of men. 

Andrew Tate’s remarks toward women are the reason he has been permanently banned from TikTok, YouTube, Twitter, and Instagram. A spokesperson for meta has said Tate was banned due to violating companies policies on dangerous organizations and individuals. 

A TikTok spokesperson said, “Misogyny is a hateful ideology that is not tolerated on Tiktok.”  Immediately after the bans, Tate closed Hustler’s University.

Following a poll I conducted at Canyon Ridge High School and other schools in the Twin Falls area, I have learned what influences Tate has on youth. 

Here are the results: out of a total of 93 students not a single girl, out of 45,  thought Tate was a positive influence on younger adolescence. Between the boys, 19 out of 48 boys thought Tate was a positive influence. 

This leaves room to question: who is Andrew Tates audience and what does he want them to believe? 

“There’s one thing in believing in a lifestyle and another that crosses a line and is dangerous,” said Aaliyah Castillo, a sophmore girl at Canyon Ridge High School. 

While another sophomore boy, Brock Johnston says, “He gives advice and helps generations.” 

Many of the girls I’ve interviewed have had the similar attitudes toward Tate. “I’m shocked that he’s idolized, and he is a foul woman hater,” said Eliza Heward, a junior. Kiara Davis, a senior, said, “He uses his wealth as an excuse for his behavior.”  Olivia Stokes, a junior, agrees saying, “Andrew Tate is a misogynist.” 

The word misogynistic was thrown around by many of the students at Canyon Ridge High School. Misogyny means to be strongly prejudiced against women. It is a form of sexism that keeps women at a lower social status as men. 

Yet, many of the boys at Canyon Ridge have mixed feelings about Tate. Jack Harrild, a junior said, “He’s got some very insightful information, but he exudes lots of toxic masculinity.” 

Ethan Morris, a senior said, “I don’t think he’s a positive influence, and my honest opinion about him is that he should be more caring about people, and he should respect that everyone wants to live a happy life.” 

Many boys believe that Tate is influencing men to become rich and to show them how to become “Top-G.” The phrase Top-G stands for Top Gangster, means someone who is feared and respected by all. This phrase was created by Tate himself. 

 Ricardo Garcia, a sophomore said, “He gives back, he helps make money and he’s a top-g.” Another anonymous sophomore boy said, “He is inspirational and top-g, he’s handsome and I look up to him.” I saw a pattern in what the sophomore boys said when another sophomore, Austin Rickett said, “He teaches people how to make money and is Top-G.” 

Andrew Tate is not one to satisfy everyone who watches him, but according to senior Rhyleigh Rogers, “If the younger generation are to watch him, especially guys, they would learn from his trashy ways on how to treat a female, which are not the right ways. Especially for this generation.”

I reached out to Andrew Tate for comment, but neither he nor someone from his organizations have responded. The invitation still stands.